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Mar 242015
 

By Brian C Joondeph — March 24, 2015

Starbucks’ latest offering, after the recently introduced flat white, is their Race Together initiative.

Starbucks Race Together initiative dead on arrival....

Starbucks Race Together initiative dead on arrival….

“As racially charged events unfolded across our country, we felt a responsibility to act,” says Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz. While the campaign was short lived, dropped soon after initiated, its very premise is still worth exploring.

Undoubtedly, the Starbucks initiative is due to recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, where according to the Starbucks store locator, there are no Starbucks coffee shops. For that matter, there are no Starbucks in Selma, Alabama either, ground zero for the civil rights movements and “racially charged events.”

Why doesn’t Starbucks have coffee shops in these “racially charged” cities? Especially if they have a “responsibility to act.” What about Starbucks itself? Does Howard Schultz and company practice what they preach? Are they racing together? Let’s look at the Starbucks leadership team.

Starbucks has nineteen executives, including Mr. Schultz. Of the 19, only 1, or 5 percent of the leadership team, is African American, far less than the rest of country, where African Americans make up 13 percent of the population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Three women are Starbucks leaders, or 16 percent of their team, hardly reflective of females making up half the population.

The names and faces on the Starbucks corporate webpage reflect no Hispanic Americans, which comprise 17 percent of the U.S. population. Unless of course there are some George Zimmerman type “White Hispanics” lurking. But there is one Indian American executive. What’s striking is that Starbucks, at the corporate level, is run by a bunch of white guys. 14 of the 19 in fact, almost 75 percent of their executives.

starbucks-corporation-ends-race-together-initiative-600

 

The “Race Together” initiative was introduced by Howard Schultz, along with USA Today Publisher and President Larry Kramer. They wrote their op-ed rolling out the initiative, extolling the need for diversity. “Elevating diversity is the right thing to do, but it is also a necessity,” they wrote.

Mr. Kramer has a similar problem to Mr. Schultz in terms of preaching and practicing. The Gannett Company publishes USA Today. How does the Gannett leadership team look under the lens of diversity? It’s a leadership team of 8. One woman and 7 men. All quite white. How’s that for diversity, Mr. Kramer and Mr. Schultz?

Let’s look at CNN, another organization fond of telling us all how to think and act. CNN columnist John Sutter wrote about the recent University of Oklahoma fraternity video. In his article he quotes a University of Connecticut sociology professor, “The U.S. fraternity and sorority system is a form of American apartheid.” Not only fraternities and sororities, but also “the rest of us and our country’s racist history.” Painting with a broad brush.

Is CNN practicing what it’s preaching? Time Warner, parent company of CNN, has 7 senior corporate executives. Two women on the team but all white. How’s that for diversity? War on women, anyone?

The CNN writer wants universities to force Greek organizations, “To report their demographics so we can see exactly how segregated this system really is?” Great idea. Why not show us how it’s done by starting with CNN, USA Today, and Starbucks?

Let’s not leave out the New York Times, another schoolmarm preaching tolerance, diversity, and other feelgood virtues. They too have an executive team of nine. One woman, one African American, and seven white guys. The same NY Times that opines about racial disparities in Ferguson and the war on women falls short on practicing what it preaches. Do as I say, not as I do.

Finally, let’s see how the Washington Post, another publication similar to the NY Times, fond of reminding us how bigoted and intolerant we are as a society, fares in terms of diversity. Their leadership team of 14 consists of two women, one Indian American, and 11 white guys. Much like the NY Times, CNN, Gannett, and Starbucks.

Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, defends Race Together initiative.

Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, defends Race Together initiative.

The Washington Post is not practicing what it preaches. “Benefiting from white privilege is automatic. Defending white privilege is a choice,” writes one Washington Post contributor. There’s no shortage of white privilege among the paper’s leadership team. The elites know better and are happy to remind the rest of us of this.

American society is racist, sexist, and bigoted, according to the smart set at major media outlets, happy to throw the stones of “Race Together” and other initiatives at the rest of us while they themselves live in glass houses.

We are the problem, you see. The self-appointed arbiters of all things race have all the answers. CNN wants to know, “Are certain organizations more integrated than others?”

Is this a question they really want asked and answered? The answers might indeed be interesting. And hypocritical. They remind us, “Racial inequality is not a topic we readily discuss. It’s time to start.” How about starting by looking in the mirror?

 

via Articles: Starbucks — Practice What You Preach.

Oct 062014
 

by Kyle Drennen — October 6, 2014

Appearing on Monday’s NBC Today, ex-CNN host Piers Morgan kept up the anti-gun crusade that caused his ratings to plummet, denouncing his colleagues in the press: “I wish more American media people, American news anchors stood up.

 Because so many of them privately to me would say, ‘I love what you’re doing. Keep going, it’s really important.’ But I never heard that on air. And I think there’s a certain moral cowardice in the media in America that needs to be addressed about guns.”

Co-host Matt Lauer began the interview by asking Morgan if he had spent the five months since being fired from CNN in March “thinking about what went wrong.” Morgan argued: “Yeah, I mean, not a lot went wrong from where I sit. I had a fantastic time at CNN.” He explained: “…you had the two big gun massacres in Aurora and Sandy Hook and something inside me just exploded, I guess. And then for the next year, it became a kind of war of attrition on air between me and the NRA and the gun lobbyists and the show changed as a result.”

 

 

Lauer followed up: “So this wasn’t – it was about ratings because people started to turn away, but it was because you became an incredibly polarizing figure in this country. Do you have any regrets about that?”

Morgan replied: “I don’t, actually….I couldn’t see, for me, how a great country like America – and it is a great country. Great people. How you could let 20 first graders be shot dead in their classrooms and the reaction would be absolutely nothing? So I don’t regret standing up for trying to affect change.” At the end of the exchange, Lauer suggested a possible comeback for Morgan: “Are you coming back to TV?…Do you want to get back on the air and talk about these things?”

morgan gun control

Morgan joked: “Well, I’ve been tapped up for your gig [as Today co-host], obviously.” He then gushed over Lauer: “No one could replace you. You’re the best at what you do in the business and I really believe that.” Responding to the question, Morgan declared: “I would love to be back on American television. It’s great to be back in here….I’m itching to get back in the game.”

Meanwhile, Morgan promoted his latest job as editor-at-large of Mail Online, the website for Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper: “Mail Online is an extraordinary website, I mean it has 60 million visitors a month in America alone. It’s the biggest English-speaking website in the world. If you don’t know it, it’s a bit like you on the Today show. It’s addictive, a little pleasure.”

On his former employer, Morgan professed to Lauer: “I had a great time at CNN. And it’s a great company….A lot of great friends there, wish them all the very best.” However, as recently as Thursday, Morgan blamed Anderson Cooper for not being a good ratings lead-in and in May trashed his predecessor Larry King as a “constant poisonous twerp.”

Here are excerpts of Morgan’s October 6 appearance on Today:

7:40 AM ET

MATT LAUER: We’re back now, 7:40, with Piers Morgan. For three years he hosted his own primetime show on CNN. Now he’s taking on a new adventure as editor-at-large for the news website Mail Online. Piers, welcome back. Good to see you.

PIERS MORGAN: It’s great to be here.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Piers Morgan One-On-One; New Role for British News Personality]

LAUER: It’s been a while. March is when you said good-bye to your viewers on CNN. winner-piers-morgan

MORGAN: I have spent five months with my cricket bat back in England.

LAUER: Have you spent five months thinking about what went wrong?

MORGAN: Yeah, I mean, not a lot went wrong from where I sit. I had a fantastic time at CNN. Amazing news organization. But I went in there to do big interviews with big figures and I did many of those for the first two years. And what then happened was you had the two big gun massacres in Aurora and Sandy Hook and something inside me just exploded, I guess. And then for the next year, it became a kind of war of attrition on air between me and the NRA and the gun lobbyists and the show changed as a result.

LAUER: So this wasn’t – it was about ratings because people started to turn away, but it was because you became an incredibly polarizing figure…

MORGAN: Yeah.

LAUER: …in this country. Do you have any regrets about that?

MORGAN: I don’t, actually. You know, in Britain, we had our own Sandy Hook in the mid ’90s at Dunblane, 16 young children were killed in their classroom. And we banned all guns, assault rifles, assault weapons, handguns, all got banned. And I couldn’t see, for me, how a great country like America – and it is a great country. Great people. How you could let 20 first graders be shot dead in their classrooms and the reaction would be absolutely nothing? So I don’t regret standing up for trying to affect change.

LAUER: It’s interesting you bring this up. So I tweeted on Friday, which I don’t do that often. And I tweeted, “Gonna catch up with Piers Morgan in our studio.” Wow. I mean, the reaction on my Twitter.

MORGAN: I’m sensing praise?

LAUER: There were some people who said “Good, love him. Welcome back.” But then there were people, Piers, who came in there and the anger was palpable in their tweets. And the feeling I got from it was, especially when it was like the gun issue, was how dare this outsider have such a critical eye on the United States. Am I close?

MORGAN: Yes. And I totally respect that. And I understand that having someone – like Jay Leno, a good mutual friend of ours, said to me, “Look, it’s like you’re going to Germany and telling them they can’t speed on the Autobahn. They may know that it’s dangerous but they don’t want to hear that from you and they definitely don’t want to hear it from your accent. And I accepted that having a Brit guy trying to reform gun law in America-

LAUER: Somebody else could have gone on the air and said what you said and gotten away with it or not had the same negative impact?

MORGAN: I wish more American media people, American news anchors stood up. Because so many of them privately to me would say, “I love what you’re doing. Keep going, it’s really important.” But I never heard that on air. And I think there’s a certain moral cowardice in the media in America that needs to be addressed about guns.

(…)

LAUER: Are you coming back to TV? I know you’ve got a busy job now. Do you want to get back on the air and talk about these things?

Remember this wonderful moment?

Remember this wonderful moment?

MORGAN: Well, I’ve been tapped up for your gig, obviously.

[LAUGHTER]

LAUER: When?

MORGAN: No one could replace you.

LAUER: Not true.

MORGAN: You’re the best at what you do in the business and I really believe that. I would love to be back on American television. It’s great to be back in here. I did a couple of weeks co-hosting with Hoda, who I know will be watching and missing me. Yeah, I’d love it.

I had a great break to clear my head. I mean, I had a great time at CNN. And it’s a great company run by Jeff Zucker, who used to obviously run the Today show and NBC. A lot of great friends there, wish them all the very best. But yeah, I’m itching to get back in the game.

Mail Online is an extraordinary website, I mean it has 60 million visitors a month in America alone. It’s the biggest English-speaking website in the world. If you don’t know it, it’s a bit like you on the Today show. It’s addictive, a little pleasure.

[LAUGHTER]

LAUER: You end with a flourish. Piers Morgan, nice to see.

MORGAN: Matt, great to see you.

LAUER: Thank you very much for being here.

 

via Piers Morgan Condemns ‘Moral Cowardice’ of Media Not Being Anti-Gun Enough.